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boehner is even interested in? >> i think it is probably something that he might consider. this is how negotiations work. congressional "fight club." they stake out their positions and sort of move closer together as they come together and actually meet and discuss this. there are couple options what they can do on the table. president signaled perhaps it doesn't have to be all about getting rates to clinton era levels. perhaps getting revenue from other places. i think that would be healthier, broader tax reform kind of deal made. i'm not sure whether they're all savvy enough to make that deal. i mean. martha: seems to me that is the major issue here. that is what john boehner was hinting at. he is suggesting that if you remove some of the loopholes that is a tax increase on the wealthy in this country. i feel like that is a message that has gotten across in perhaps a clear enough way. if you do same thing for u.s. corporations and roof move tax loopholes and don't end up in a situation where ge doesn't pay anything and small business pays through the nose. why isn't that kind of refo
by significant spending cuts? >> that was speaker of the house, john boehner after congressional leaders met with the president, earlier today to try to negotiate a way to avert the so-called fiscal cliff. both sides of the aisle came out confident that a deal would be made before the january 1 deadline. but neither side provided specifics on how that is going to happen. after boehner's vague comments, there are new concerns that the speaker may give up way too much and agree to tax increases. i'm here to lay out exactly what he has on the table. congressman, good to see you. >> good to be with you, sean. >> sean: i am concerned because -- >> i am -- you and me both? >> i am concerned about caving. you have outgoing virginia governor mcdonald, and former governor haley barbour and others saying, maybe we can give in on these things. did any house republican get elected and say to their constit webts they would raise taxes? if they did, i didn't hear it. >> i don't know a single one. sean, this is not the time to be defensive. and of course, there are plenty of people who say i am very offens
. >>> if the fiscal cliff negotiations seem familiar, we've seen the movie before. president obama and speaker boehner were unable to reach a debt deal in 2001. one of the by-products of the inaction was a downgrade of the country's credit rating. could this happen again? and what would it mean for the nation's financial standing across the globe? joining me is jared bernstein, senior fellow at the center for budget policies and priorities. good to see you again, when it comes to the credit rating, we've seen it happen before. all three credit rating agencies are saying you've got to put a deal together in washington, if you guys in washington don't get it done, we're going to downgrade your credit. >> we've seen this movie before. it's not a good movie. i will remind viewers that the last time standard and poors did take us down a notch, it actually didn't hurt our ability to finance our debt at all. so that was kind of blown off by the markets, but this time could be different. there's one interesting wrinkle here. i do believe that if the political discourse, which is actually sounding a little bet
as the middle class does not get hurt. house speaker john boehner seems optimistic about these negotiations. >> we can all imagine a scenario where we go off the fiscal cliff. if, if despite the election, if despite the dangers of going over the fiscal cliff and what that means for our economy that there's too much stubbornness in congress that we can't even agree on giving middle class family as tax cut, then, middle class families will all end up having a big tax hike. >> there are no barriers here to sitting down and beginning to work through this process. i don't think anyone on either side of the aisle underestimates the difficulty that faces us. but i do think that the spirit of cooperation that you have seen over the last week from myself and my team, from democrats across the aisle, from the president, have created an atmosphere where i think that, i'm, remain optimistic. i was born with a glass half-full. if i hadn't been i sure wouldn't be here. jon: so let's get to it. how close are we to the edge of that fiscal cliff? marjorie clifton, a former consultant to the obama campaign a
the election, speaker boehner sate said the fight is over and it is i now the law of the land. do these refusals mean the fight may not be over? >> i think the federal government is prepared to run exchanges in the states that don't cooperate. speaker boehner is right, the congress will no longer talk about repealing the law. i think if congress we will see pb cans raising portions of the law they think are controversial or may be able to attract democratic votes and peel back smaller pieces of the health reform law. >> what's your best guess that the the states will adhere to the deadline. mid december ito make their attentions known. >> i think it is important to note the health reform law, people have to select plans beginning in ok of next year and the plans go live in the year following. there's not a lot of time between now and then. states want to run their state exchanges we will know by december which ones are ready and which aren't. >>> ahead, getting to the truth about ben benz. a house member who grilled general petraeus on captiol hill joins us in just a moment. yeah,
and the ongoing relationship with boehner and mcconnell because he's going to have to be a different kind of leader with them. he talked about it in the press conference a bit the other day. he needs to reach out to them the way he's reached out to people on staten island and dealt with the two governors, christie and cuomo, who are two pretty demanding guys as well. and based on their public and private comments have been very happy with the president's leadership and his government. >> i just wonder if it's fair to make a parallel when you look at the president's response to sandy which has had and continues to have just devastating effects on the economy for businesses and the reaction to the bp oil spill which seemed slow in coming because that was devastating as well to a different part of the country. >> he certainly was. he was very slow to respond to people in the gulf coast. >> in terms of appearances. >> i think things have changed, though, over the past couple years. and i suspect that, you know, even the president's closest allies will say that it was a very hard adjustment go
the microphone with pelosi and with reid and boehner at the side saying that revenue is on the table, but when the talks ramp back up after thanksgiving, is this an issue to be real negotiation or dig-in time? >> i hope it is time for a negotiation. look, if there is one thing that we learned from the president's campaign, he promised to raise taxes on the wealthy. and here is a news flash to the republicans out there, elections have consequences, and that is what he wants to do, and i'm sure he is going to accomplish some of that, but on either side when you dig in before the negotiations start, not only does it look bad, it makes the markets go up and down, and it creates instability, and insecurity among the people out here in the country feeling the pain and the brunt of some of the economic policies and the fact of the matter is that both sides need to come into it with some level of give and take, and that is how you govern and get it done, and if the president is going to ak kccomplish the polis that he did in first term that he promised in the second, he is going to have to get some of
was open to listening to ideas from republicans. john boehner was just down there at the white house on friday, it's the beginning. we want to show him if he wants to gain revenues we are more than willing to talk about closing and limiting loopholes. bill: which loophole would you close? >> we'll sit down and lay them all on the table. there are a lot of ways you can go through. we have to have reforms. what you need to do too, the structural change. you have to have structural change otherwise you're going to continue to this trillion dollar deficits sthao based on your experience in working with president obama is he willing to go for significant tax reform, change the whole problem? that would be historical. >> we will not get out of this mess without growing this economy, and the only way to do that is to have structural reform and tax reform. this isn't something that republicans have sat back on. we have passed legislation already that sets up the framework to have tax ry reform. we've passed it to take away the sequestration that he says in the debate will not happen. bee hav
. former lt. governor of new york. and author of decoding the obama health law. john boehner said it is now the law of the land. good to see you. biggest colonel to me, my family and to people out there watching. will my quality of care care change? >> first of all, you may lose the plan you get on your job. and you may lose full-time job status as a result. this law says that employers. >> is this all of it. >> this is all of it. >> we like our guests to bring us cake not 2,000 pages of healthcare legislation. >> unfortunately this is what you have got. this law says that employers with 50 or more full-time workers have to provide health insurance. not just any health insurance but the one size fits all government designed plan. that cost almost twice as much as what many employers currently provide. so, as a result. employers in many cases are going to drop the coverage and may even move their full-time employees into part time status to avoid the penalty. >> we have already seen companies doing that. >> that's right. and the government actually predicts that under this employer mandate,
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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